“elizabeth holmes was right about personalised nutrition! How to test nutritional deficiency..

“Elizabeth Holmes Was Right About Personalised Nutrition! How to Test Nutritional Deficiency..


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“Elizabeth Holmes Was Right About Personalised Nutrition! Recent Studies Show How Gut Microbiome and Scientific Tests Can Revolutionise Your Health!”

Personalised Nutrition the Hidden Secrets to Inner Health..

Elizabeth Holmes What Happened?

Elizabeth Holmes, the infamous founder of Theranos, may have been exposed for fraud, but her vision for personalised medicine and nutrition is proving to be the way forward for better health. Recent studies have shed light on the importance of gut microbiome and scientifically proven tests for nutritional status, showing that individuals are unique in their needs and should be treated accordingly.

The gut microbiome is a complex ecosystem of microorganisms that reside in the digestive tract. Research has shown that a healthy gut microbiome is crucial for overall health, and can affect everything from weight management to mental health. Personalised medicine can help individuals identify the specific bacteria in their gut, and tailor their diet and lifestyle to promote a healthy microbiome.


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Scientific tests for nutritional status, such as blood tests, can also help identify deficiencies or imbalances in essential vitamins and minerals. These tests can be used to customise a personalised nutrition, diet and supplement plan that meets an individual’s specific needs. This personalised approach to nutrition has been shown to improve overall health and well-being, and can even prevent chronic diseases.

While Elizabeth Holmes may have used fraudulent practices to promote her vision, the scientific evidence supports the idea that personalised medicine and nutrition is the way forward for better health. By focusing on the unique needs of each individual, we can optimise health outcomes and prevent chronic diseases. It’s time to take control of your health and embrace the future of personalised nutrition.

Personalised Nutrition – How to Assess for Nutritional Deficiencies:

As mentioned earlier, scientific tests for nutritional status can help identify deficiencies or imbalances in essential vitamins and minerals. Once a deficiency has been identified, a personalised nutrition diet plan can be created to address the specific needs of the individual. Here is an example personalised diet plan for a deficiency in each vitamin or mineral sequentially:

Vitamin A deficiency: Vitamin A is essential for healthy vision, immune system function, and skin health. To address a deficiency in vitamin A, an individual could include foods such as sweet potatoes, carrots, spinach, and kale in their diet. These foods are high in beta-carotene, which can be converted into vitamin A in the body.

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Vitamin B12 deficiency: Vitamin B12 is essential for healthy nerve function and the formation of red blood cells. A deficiency in vitamin B12 can be addressed by including foods such as meat, fish, eggs, and dairy products in the diet. If an individual follows a vegan or vegetarian diet, they may need to take a B12 supplement to address a deficiency.

Vitamin C deficiency: Vitamin C is important for immune system function, skin health, and the absorption of iron. To address a deficiency in vitamin C, an individual could include foods such as citrus fruits, kiwi, strawberries, and bell peppers in their diet.

Vitamin D deficiency: Vitamin D is essential for bone health, immune system function, and mood regulation. A deficiency in vitamin D can be addressed by spending time in the sun or taking a vitamin D supplement. Foods such as fatty fish, egg yolks, and fortified milk and cereal can also provide vitamin D.

Iron deficiency: Iron is essential for the formation of red blood cells and the transport of oxygen throughout the body. To address a deficiency in iron, an individual could include foods such as red meat, poultry, fish, beans, and leafy greens in their diet.

Calcium deficiency: Calcium is important for bone health, muscle function, and nerve function. To address a deficiency in calcium, an individual could include foods such as dairy products, leafy greens, and fortified cereal in their diet.

Magnesium deficiency: Magnesium is important for nerve function, muscle function, and bone health. To address a deficiency in magnesium, an individual could include foods such as nuts, seeds, leafy greens, and whole grains in their diet.

By addressing deficiencies in vitamins and minerals through a personalised nutrition diet plan, individuals can optimise their health and prevent chronic diseases. It’s important to consult with a healthcare professional before making any significant changes to your diet or supplement regimen.

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Personalised Nutrition: A Quick Questionnaire to Estimate Nutritional Deficiency Risk:

To assess deficiencies in specific vitamins and minerals in the diet, a questionnaire with a scoring system can be created. The following questionnaire is based on scientific literature and is designed to assess deficiencies in major nutrients:

Vitamin A:

  1. How often do you eat orange or yellow fruits and vegetables? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat dark, leafy greens? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat liver or liver pate? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-3 points: Severe deficiency 4-6 points: Moderate deficiency 7-9 points: Mild deficiency 10 or more points: No deficiency

Vitamin B12:

  1. How often do you eat meat, fish, or poultry? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat dairy products? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you take a B12 supplement? (1 point for each time per week)
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Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

Vitamin C:

  1. How often do you eat citrus fruits or drink citrus juices? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat strawberries, kiwi, or papaya? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat tomatoes or tomato-based products? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-3 points: Severe deficiency 4-6 points: Moderate deficiency 7-9 points: Mild deficiency 10 or more points: No deficiency

Vitamin D:

  1. How often do you spend time outside in the sun? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat fatty fish? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you drink milk or consume dairy products fortified with vitamin D? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

Iron:

  1. How often do you eat red meat? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat beans or legumes? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat dark, leafy greens? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

Calcium:

  1. How often do you drink milk or consume dairy products? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat calcium-fortified cereal or bread? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat leafy greens? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

Magnesium:

  1. How often do you eat nuts or seeds? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat whole grains? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat dark, leafy greens? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

Zinc:

  1. How often do you eat red meat? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat seafood? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat nuts or seeds? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

Iodine:

  1. How often do you eat seafood? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you use iodised salt in your food? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat dairy products? (1 point for each time per week)
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Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

Selenium:

  1. How often do you eat seafood? (1 point for each time per week)
  2. How often do you eat nuts or seeds? (1 point for each time per week)
  3. How often do you eat whole grains? (1 point for each time per week)

Scoring: 0-2 points: Severe deficiency 3-4 points: Moderate deficiency 5-6 points: Mild deficiency 7 or more points: No deficiency

After answering the questionnaire, add up the total points for each nutrient to determine the level of deficiency. A high score indicates a low risk of deficiency, while a low score suggests a higher risk.

Personalised Nutrition – A Few Final Words:

Based on the identified deficiencies, a personalised nutrition diet plan can be created to address the nutrient gaps. For example, if the questionnaire reveals a severe deficiency in Vitamin A, the personalised diet plan may include foods rich in Vitamin A such as carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, and liver. If the questionnaire shows a moderate deficiency in Calcium, the diet plan may include calcium-fortified foods such as cereal or bread, dairy products, and leafy greens.

By assessing nutrient deficiencies and creating a personalised diet plan, individuals can optimise their health and prevent chronic diseases associated with nutrient deficiencies.

This of course is a rough guide to assessing nutritional deficiences without testing and doesn’t substitute for the real thing, but testing for some deficiencies is expensive and this can be used to provide a rough ‘quick’ assessment in the hands of a qualified nutrition professional.

 

References:

Vitamin A:

  1. Penniston KL, Tanumihardjo SA. The acute and chronic toxic effects of vitamin A. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(2):191-201. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/83.2.191. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/83/2/191/4630421
  2. Institute of Medicine (US) Panel on Micronutrients. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. National Academies Press (US); 2001. PMID: 25077263. Available from: https://www.nap.edu/catalog/10026/dietary-reference-intakes-for-vitamin-a-vitamin-k-arsenic-boron

Vitamin D:

  1. Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl J Med. 2007;357(3):266-281. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra070553. Available from: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMra070553
  2. Institute of Medicine (US) Committee to Review Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin D and Calcium. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. National Academies Press (US); 2011. PMID: 21796828. Available from: https://www.nap.edu/catalog/13050/dietary-reference-intakes-for-calcium-and-vitamin-d

Iron:

  1. Hurrell R, Egli I. Iron bioavailability and dietary reference values. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(5):1461S-1467S. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.28674F. Available from: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/91/5/1461S/4597264
  2. Institute of Medicine (US) Panel on Micronutrients. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. National Academies Press (US); 2001. PMID: 25077263. Available from: https://www.nap.edu/catalog/10026/dietary-reference-intakes-for-vitamin-a-vitamin-k-arsenic-boron

Calcium:

  1. Weaver CM. Calcium in health and disease. Food Nutr Res. 2008;52:10.3402/fnr.v52i0.1591. doi: 10.3402/fnr.v52i0.1591. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2854916/

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